jtotheizzoe
jtotheizzoe:

colchrishadfield:

21,000 years ago, the ice over Montreal was 3 kilometers thick, and dwarfed the Sears and CN Towers. The land is still rising back up like a sponge from the great weight of the ice. Conditions changing over time. (xkcd)

So which one is Winterfell, Toronto or Montreal?

Having lived in both Toronto and Montreal, Montreal still sometimes feels like this? Amirite?

jtotheizzoe:

colchrishadfield:

21,000 years ago, the ice over Montreal was 3 kilometers thick, and dwarfed the Sears and CN Towers. The land is still rising back up like a sponge from the great weight of the ice. Conditions changing over time. (xkcd)

So which one is Winterfell, Toronto or Montreal?

Having lived in both Toronto and Montreal, Montreal still sometimes feels like this? Amirite?

anthrocentric

thebrainscoop:

Cosmopolitan: Get That Life 
How I became a museum’s Chief Curiosity Correspondent

Did you ever think Cosmo would run an image of dermestid beetles nibbling on a goose carcass? 

WELL, THEY DID. 

I can’t describe how proud I am that such a popular magazine typically focused on fashion and sex tips is also incorporating scientists into their features because fashion and sex tips and gross anatomy are not at all mutually exclusive. 

We are rebranding feminism and empowerment one major media publication at a time. 

Thank you, world. 

double-bond
ellliot:

gnostic-forest:

emkaymlp:

mj-the-scientist:

invaderxan:

Mars. In true colour.
Just so you know, a lot of images of Mars which you’ll see have been manipulated. A lot of them have boosted contrast and saturation. So if you’ve ever wondered – images like this one are what Mars actually looks like.

Why does this not have more notes?!?
YOU ARE LITERALLY LOOKING THROUGH THE EYES OF A ROBOT ON ANOTHER FUCKING PLANET
If you don’t think that’s the tightest shit, you can get out of my face.

i wanted to reblog this so that everyone who sees it can realize just how amazing this is. you are looking at a photograph taken on an entirely different planet. an entire world that has been completely untouched by humanity until only recently. no human in the history of mankind has ever look at those rocks, the soil, the mountains, and the sky until now. and until we finally manage to set foot there for the very first time, no human has ever seen mars from this perspective with their own two eyes or feel the texture of the martian soil on the bottom of their boots. this was only possible by creating a robot, an actual robot, and shooting way out of the reaches of earth and with extremely careful calculations, have it safely land and deploy right where they want it. it’s a robot on another planet being controlled 225 million kilometers away, seeing and studying and sending information for us.
this is the sort of thing you would see in science fiction movies that are only a few decades old. what was only imagination and possibilities back then is now all in this photograph. im looking forward to see what happens in the coming decades

I’m so infatuated by this. 

225 million kilometers away and we got it on film that blows my mind

ellliot:

gnostic-forest:

emkaymlp:

mj-the-scientist:

invaderxan:

Mars. In true colour.

Just so you know, a lot of images of Mars which you’ll see have been manipulated. A lot of them have boosted contrast and saturation. So if you’ve ever wondered – images like this one are what Mars actually looks like.

Why does this not have more notes?!?

YOU ARE LITERALLY LOOKING THROUGH THE EYES OF A ROBOT ON ANOTHER FUCKING PLANET

If you don’t think that’s the tightest shit, you can get out of my face.

i wanted to reblog this so that everyone who sees it can realize just how amazing this is. you are looking at a photograph taken on an entirely different planet. an entire world that has been completely untouched by humanity until only recently. no human in the history of mankind has ever look at those rocks, the soil, the mountains, and the sky until now. and until we finally manage to set foot there for the very first time, no human has ever seen mars from this perspective with their own two eyes or feel the texture of the martian soil on the bottom of their boots. this was only possible by creating a robot, an actual robot, and shooting way out of the reaches of earth and with extremely careful calculations, have it safely land and deploy right where they want it. it’s a robot on another planet being controlled 225 million kilometers away, seeing and studying and sending information for us.

this is the sort of thing you would see in science fiction movies that are only a few decades old. what was only imagination and possibilities back then is now all in this photograph. im looking forward to see what happens in the coming decades

I’m so infatuated by this. 

225 million kilometers away and we got it on film that blows my mind

shychemist

Shortly after Kathryn Tucker started RedRover, an app that showcases local events for kids, she pitched the idea to an angel investor at a New York tech event. But it didn’t go over well. When she finished her pitch, the investor said he didn’t invest in women.

When she asked why, he told her. “I don’t like the way women think,” he said. “They haven’t mastered linear thinking.” To prove his point, he explained that his wife could never prioritize her to-do lists properly. And then, as if he was trying to compliment her, he told Tucker she was different. “You’re more male,” he said.

Tucker didn’t need to hear any more. “I said, ‘Thanks very much,’ walked out, and never spoke to him again,” she recalled earlier this year, as part of a panel discussion on “fundraising while female” at the annual Internet Week conference in New York.

Floaters become more apparent with age, but are simply shadow reflections of debris onto our retinas caused by imperfections in the vitreous humour (the gel-like substance that covers our eyes), and most people see them when looking at something super bright, like the sky.
We like them cuz they kind of make everything look like a David Hockney pool painting?
More/source

Floaters become more apparent with age, but are simply shadow reflections of debris onto our retinas caused by imperfections in the vitreous humour (the gel-like substance that covers our eyes), and most people see them when looking at something super bright, like the sky.

We like them cuz they kind of make everything look like a David Hockney pool painting?

More/source